Piemonte Ancient Risotto with Sausage and Rum (Antico Risotto Salsiccia e Rum)

Risotto with sausage and rum has a strong flavour, it is delicious and a very piece of Piemonte tradition.

Milk Honey and Rum first video recipe!

I’m so excited to announce the first video recipe on Milk Honey and Rum! I’m unfamiliar with the production of video and it was a small challenge. The result is not perfect but I hope this video helps to better understand the steps. This too, as many recipes on this site, is really easy and hopefully the video shows it well.

A recipe of the seventeenth century

Piemonte Ancient Risotto with sausage and rum is a very ancient recipe. It seems that the recipe dates back to the period at the end of the seventeenth century in which they were flourishing trade and commerce with Europe. Most likely just a result of the Peace of the Pyrenees, when the traders came into contact with many goods produced in Spain and imported, among others, the Rum.

Risotto with sausage and rum has a strong flavour, it is delicious and a very piece of Piemonte tradition.

According to the sources it seems that at the end of the seventeenth century imports far exceeded the value of exports. It is also worth mentioning that the contamination from the Spanish into the cuisine of Piemonte were not missing.
Not only the Rum but also the so-called tartra, the “battuta” (chopped with a knife) of raw meat pie served in a compact circular, whose name derives from the Spanish or turtle cake, flan circular.

Risotto with sausage and rum has a strong flavour, it is delicious and a very piece of Piemonte tradition. Someone in the season love to grate over some truffles. Personally I love to eat this risotto without any other flavours, as its own is so complete and harmonious.

 

Piemonte Ancient Risotto with Sausage and Rum (Antico Risotto Salsiccia e Rum)

Rating: 51

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 25 minutes

Yield: 6

Ingredients

  • 18 oz. of rice for risotto like Carnaroli or Roma or Arborio
  • 2 stalks celery with leaves
  • 2 onions
  • 1 carrot
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 3.5 oz of butter
  • 1 large handful of Parmesan cheese
  • 4-5 tablespoons of tomato sauce
  • Beef or vegetable broth
  • 1 bunch of herbs tied with kitchen string (rosemary, sage, bay leaves)
  • 1/2 cup of rum
  • 14 oz of lean sausage
  • olive oil
  • black pepper

Instructions

    For this recipe are available the video instructions on you tube
  1. Prepare a bunch of herbs
  2. Remove the sausage from its casing and crumble
  3. Chop onion, celery and carrot
  4. Put the mixture in a saucepan, along with the whole garlic cloves and a couple of tablespoons of olive oil
  5. When the soffritto is ready add the sausage and let it brown for a few minutes
  6. Pour almost all the rum (save 3 tablespoons) and let it soak
  7. Put the rice and toast it, turning occasionally moving the pot, or using a wooden spoon
  8. add the tomato sauce and a ladle of broth, stir and leave to absorb
  9. Put the bunch of herbs into the rice
  10. as soon as the first ladle of broth will be absorbed, add another tablespoon, and proceed in this way, typical of rice cooking, until the rice is cooked
  11. As soon as the rice is cooked, turn off the stove, remove the bunch of aromatic herbs and garlic
  12. cream the rice with butter, rum and Parmesan
  13. Let stand 3-5 minutes, then serve hot
http://milkhoneyandrum.com/piemonte-ancient-risotto-with-sausage-and-rum-antico-risotto-salsiccia-e-rum/

Risotto with sausage and rum has a strong flavour, it is delicious and a very piece of Piemonte tradition.

Porcini Risotto Piedmont style

Porcini Risotto Piedmont style

Porcini Risotto Piedmont style

The perfect season to go for long walks in the woods to hunt for mushrooms starts normally in september, in the mountains of Piedmont and the Aosta Valley, along with the first rains and lower temperature. But this is a very weird summer in Northern Italy. Abundant rains and temperatures lower than the seasonal average made the climate already perfect for mushrooms in August.

In Valle d’Aosta, where I’m spending some days resting and trekking, the wood made a wonderful gift.

I was so surprised to find these beautiful porcini!!

Therefore last night we had an unexpected and delicious porcini risotto.

Porcini Risotto Piedmont style

I haven’t here my Canon and the light as well as all the settings are not ideal for shooting, but I had a special collaborator, my husband and his handy camera shot all the process. Was the first time ever that I had such a precious help! And was so funny! And the recipe is so scrumptious that worths every single second and shot!

I also promised to share with you some tips to cook a perfect Piedmont style porcini risotto, that are mainly 3:

 

  • Abundant extremely fresh porcini: for this recipe you need to use only fresh porcini, not dried, the boletus must be very fresh, very white, and the spores still not dark or yellow. The flavor of fresh porcini is delicate so it is important to use a generous amount of mushrooms, about 3-4 oz. each portion
  • Cooking point: rice and mushrooms should be al dente, the rice has reached the point of cooking when the grain is white inside and translucent outside. Porcini mushrooms should be cooked no more than 10 minutes and should keep the crisp and the scent of brushwood, overcooked porcini mushroom become soggy and lost most of flavor and scent.
  • No broth, no other kind of flavor enhancers: the delicate flavor of the porcini would be covered by both meat and vegetables broths, changing the scent. To enhance flavor use just parmesan at the end of cooking. Who does not love the flavors too delicate can add to the water used to cook the rice a pinch or two of coarse unrefined sea salt.

Hope you enjoy this really easy and delicious piece of Piedmont!

Porcini Risotto Piedmont style

Rating: 51

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 40 minutes

Yield: 2

Ingredients

  • 1 cup rice carnaroli for risotto
  • 1 fresh porcino boletus (ca. 7 oz.)
  • 1 cup of dry white wine: I have used a Piedmontese Roero Arneis D.O.C.G., but one dry, structured but not too flavored, local chardonnay will be perfect
  • 1 white onion
  • 6 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons of butter
  • 4 tablespoons of parmesan

Instructions

  1. Clean and cut an onion coarsely
  2. Cut the boletus
  3. Boil about 100 fl. oz. water
  4. In a pan put about 6 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil and place on the stove over medium heat
  5. As soon as the oil is warm, add the rice, letting it toast for a few minutes, about 5
  6. Once the rice is toasted, add the onion and let it sweat, making sure not to burn, it must become transparent but not brown
  7. As soon as the onion is sweated simmer with dry white wine
  8. Let the white wine dry for about 5 minutes, then add the water 1 ladle at a time, always waiting that the water reduce by half before to add another one
  9. As soon as the rice is almost ready, about 10 minutes before the perfect cooking point, ca. 20 minutes after the start of cooking, add the porcini boletus mushrooms, and pour another one ladle of water
  10. After about 10 minutes turn off the stove and cream with butter
  11. And as soon as the butter is melted, add the parmesan
  12. The porcini risotto is ready! Serve hot with a glass of white wine, structured but not too flavored, like Roero Arneis D.O.C.G., Chardonnay, Pinot blanc or Cabernet blanc.
http://milkhoneyandrum.com/porcini-risotto-piedmont-style/

Porcini Risotto Piedmont style